Monthly Archives: March 2013

Episode 25 – The …a Man to Fish… Photography Business Podcast w/ Paul Gero Part 2

Let’s not mess around – check out Part 1 of our interview with Paul Gero and then dive headlong into Part 2.  We pick up right where we left off talking about Paul’s business and direction going forward and we also cover issues of longevity in business, the state of the professional photography industry, and the realities and impact of sponsorship.  I think you’ll dig it.

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As always we welcome your suggestions for future topics and guests.  Send any show ideas to [email protected].  Also, I am interested in playing around with the podcast format and we might do a Q&A episode soon or even produce an episode where one of you listeners can grill me with whatever questions you have.  So nominate yourself or send your questions to HERE.

If you like the podcast please share it out and Follow on Twitter or Like on Facebook for future updates and episodes.

- trr

We’ve got new SEXY BUSINESS Dates announced for Atlanta (July 7-10) and Boston (November 3-6) later this year.  Check out the WORKSHOPS page for more information.

Episode 24 – The …a Man to Fish… Photography Business Podcast w/ Paul Gero Part 1

Paul is the podcast gift that keeps on giving. Last week’s episode with Jonathan Canlas was one of the most-listened-to podcast to date and Paul was the person that put Jonathan and I together.  Originally Paul contacted me to talk about revitalizing his business.  Paul is one of the few in this industry who has been behind the camera professionally for 30 years with no signs of stopping.  But like most of us who make it past a few years Paul is finding himself in a transition period needing to revitalize his business post-recession.

What follows is a two-part interview.  In the first installment we cover Paul’s history in photography included working in newspapers, sports, and editorial photography prior to transitioning into portraits and weddings.  From there we transition into examining Paul’s value proposition and how he’s going to adjust his branding/positioning going forward.  For those of you interested in the SEXY BUSINESS Workshop and how we approach brand development and marketing/value-communication this interview will give you a taste as to how we approach that.

Paul is one of the good guys and I’m quite thankful that he was so candid in this interview.  Please check back April 1st (Fool’s day suckah!) for Part 2 of this interview where we talk more branding/positioning as well as about the realities and drawbacks of sponsorship and the state of the photo industry.  You won’t want to miss it.

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As always we welcome your suggestions for future topics and guests.  Send any show ideas to [email protected].  Also, I am interested in playing around with the podcast format and we might do a Q&A episode soon or even produce an episode where one of you listeners can grill me with whatever questions you have.  So nominate yourself or send your questions to HERE.

If you like the podcast please share it out and Follow on Twitter or Like on Facebook for future updates and episodes.

- trr

We’ve got new SEXY BUSINESS Dates announced for Atlanta (July 7-10) and Boston (November 3-6) later this year.  Check out the WORKSHOPS page for more information.

An open letter to Apple…

An open letter to Apple.

I feel like the message I received this morning, ‘Apple wins 9 straight JD Power and Associate Awards’ is the beginning of the end.

I’m not sure when you started caring about what anybody else thinks, but it’s not attractive on you.

The world fell in love with you when you stopped caring about your competitors, when you stopped taking them seriously.  You even went so far as to belittle them in brilliant ad after brilliant ad.  But never, ever acted like they were a real threat to your brand.  The old Apple would have seen an award like that as just a blip on the screen, an “of course we won”, but not something to stop and brag about- you had more important work to do.

The last few email and ad campaigns I’ve seen from you have made me sad.  Because I realize that you aren’t who you used to be anymore.  You seem to have stopped innovating and started worrying.  You’re trying to convince us, when we didn’t need convincing- we already loved you.  But the more you ask us if we still think you’re pretty, the more we start to see your flaws, and the more your insecurity emerges.

We just want you to be badass and awesome and fearless to do things that we didn’t even know that we needed until we see how mind-blowingly awesome the possibilities could be.

I hope I’m wrong, and that you’ll soon recover from whatever self-doubt you’re currently wallowing in and that you’ll hurry up and go back to being what we need you to be.  I fear if you don’t, you’ll just melt away into the sea of technology sameness, treating yourself as one of many, and attempting to win battles instead of wars.

Please come back, Apple.  The world needs more bold creators who make amazing things that change the world, not things that are 10% better than what their competitor just made.

- Jamie

By |March 25th, 2013|Business, Purpose|0 Comments

Episode 23 – The …a Man to Fish… Photography Business Podcast w/ Jonathan Canlas

Before I say anything else I have to thank Paul Gero for setting this up.  Paul introduced me to Jonathan.  Jonathan has carved out a niche as a film advocate with the FILM IS NOT DEAD workshop and book series.  Now Jonathan has a business-related book to add to the empire.  Sounds like a prime time to talk business.

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  • Check out the new FIND Business Guide HERE
  • Dates for the Film Is Not Dead Workshop can be found HERE
  • Got some film to burn?  Get it developed at the FIND Lab

Also, if you have yet to read the personal post yesterday that I referenced in the podcast, please check out “Why I care about business”

As always we welcome your suggestions for future topics and guests.  Send any show ideas to [email protected].  Also, I am interested in playing around with the podcast format and we might do a Q&A episode soon or even produce an episode where one of you listeners can grill me with whatever questions you have.  So nominate yourself or send your questions to HERE.

If you like the podcast please share it out and Follow on Twitter or Like on Facebook for future updates and episodes.

- trr

We did the WPPI thing last week and we’re very happy to be home.  We’ve got new SEXY BUSINESS Dates announced for Tucson (April 22-25), Atlanta (July 7-10) and Boston (November 3-6) later this year.  Check out the WORKSHOPS page for more information.

We’re doing some adjustments to the whole SEXY BUSINESS process so all further workshops will be for advanced business owners (a more beginner option will be introduced soon).  If you’re curious about whether the Advanced or Beginner option is right for you drop me a line at [email protected]

Why I Care About Business

2012 was the worst year of my life.  It wasn’t the worst year because bad things happened (they did) it was the worst year because the bad things got the best of me and overtook the good things in my focus.

I started the year working too much.  I was stressed because we had moved the year before and I really needed for 2012 to be the year we established ourselves in our new market.  I was OK with 2011 being a transitional year but I had to get serious and I thought I needed to be back up to full capacity in 2012 or I’d be in trouble.  So I pressed hard on the workshops.  I spent all my time trying to book more weddings (or stressing about it).  I was working all the time.

My mom moved to Atlanta at the end of 2011 and I thought it would be a great chance to be closer and spend more time together.  I’d resolved that as soon as I finished all the business stuff I needed to do in the first quarter of 2012 I’d hang out with my mom more.  Then in the middle of doing the last workshop of my busy period my mom had a stroke and passed away.

This isn’t a blog post about loss or sadness or regret, this is a post about what really matters in life.

It is easy to become engrossed with the idea that your job is your identity.  It is very popular to say that you are selling yourself, or that your business is all about you.  I hate that, because the market can’t have all of me.  I have a life I need to lead and I don’t want photography to take over.

I get it – photography is your life.  I guess it is OK if you feel that way.  But I can guarantee you that years down the road I’m going to regret not spending more time with my mom more than I’ll regret not booking more weddings or workshops.

The business side of things allows you to build boundaries.  It tells you how much you need to dedicate to working, and it tells you how much you need to do to execute on your value proposition.  Everything else can go.  The business is really the intermediary between your photography and your clients.  The business translates what you do to why it matters to clients.  If we define our value proposition and communicate it properly through our business, we always know when we are being successful, and where we can draw a line and step away to live our lives.

I hate money.  I don’t really like thinking about it or even spending it.  But I have to bring it in.  I have to budget how much time and energy I’m going to put into making that money.  I also need for my clients to be thrilled, both from a business standpoint and from a moral standpoint.  The “business” is what defines expectations and systems that makes all that satisfaction happen.

I have a confession to make.  I don’t love photography.  I do have an enormous amount of respect for the craft of photography.  What I love is my wife.  I love my friends.  And most of the time I love the effect that photography can have on my clients.  I care about business because it ensures that everything that needs to happen comes through.

- trr